FORTHCOMING FROM PROVINCETOWN ARTS PRESS IN AUGUST

David W. Dunlap’s BUILDING PROVINCETOWN

A new edition in full color

Building Provincetown by David W. Dunlap
David Dunlap’s unique black-and-white volume on the architecture — and related history — of Provincetown was first published by the Town of Provincetown in 2015. Two initial printings quickly sold out, and the book has been out of print since. This new edition, which will include a limited number of copies signed by Dunlap, will be in full color, with a new introduction by John DaSilva, FAIA, to accompany the introductions from the original edition.
New edition expected to begin shipping late August 2021

Boston Globe

“Dunlap has been the maestro for a collective outpouring by the citizens of Provincetown. Residents opened their homes, photo albums, and memories to Dunlap, who fell in love with the town when he first visited decades ago. … The book is not only a ‘what’s where’ — with 625 entries organized by street address — but a who’s who, with stories celebrating fishermen, rebels, and many of the biggest names in American arts and letters.”

— Jan Gardner, Boston Globe

Provincetown Banner

“A stunningly comprehensive page-turner, full of engrossing details about public and private buildings and spaces.”

— Edward Miller, Provincetown Banner

Provincetown Magazine

“A mind-blowing, comprehensive document that encompasses every element of a town with an embarrassment of riches …. The project seeks to collect the history of the town’s structures, both inside and out, and in turn tell the story of the town and have it available for future generations.”

— Steve Desroches, Provincetown Magazine

Cape Cod Times

“Includes all kinds of lore that doesn’t make history texts or Google searches.”

— K. C. Myers, Cape Cod Times

Provincetown Banner

“Everyone from life-long residents, to permanent washashores, local fishermen, boat builders, restaurant or business owners, innkeepers, writers and artists were consulted or freely added their own input. … Dunlap is deeply knowledgeable and his prose is graceful, witty, and resonant. Most of all, he clearly loves Provincetown. He is also a realist who notes that Provincetown is changing and not necessarily for the better.”

— Deborah Minsky, Provincetown Banner